Skip Navigation

Worth a Thousand Words: The Raimey-Noland Campaign

When the chancellor called on alumni to help make UW–Madison a more welcoming place, Badgers responded by opening their hearts and their wallets.

Bryan Suzan
October 07, 2021
Raimey-Noland

In March 2021, UW–Madison and the Wisconsin Foundation and Alumni Association announced the launch of the Raimey-Noland Campaign, which raises funds to support making the UW campus more diverse and inclusive. The campaign takes its name from two figures out of the university’s history: the first openly identifying Black woman (Mabel Watson Raimey 1918) and man (William Smith Noland 1875) to graduate from the UW. But its focus is on building a more welcoming future.

Last month, Chancellor Blank wrote in her blog that the campaign had already raised $50 million, far outpacing expectations. Those gifts are already having effects on campus — effects that can be seen in people, places, and programs. Take a look at some of the ways Badger alumni and friends are making the UW a more welcoming place.

Students

One chief focus of the Raimey-Noland Campaign is to support student financial aid, both in undergraduate scholarships and graduate fellowships. It has increased funds for existing scholarships, such as the Mercile J. Lee Chancellor’s Scholarships. In the future, the UW will see more Chancellor’s Scholars go from student to grad, as did Cathryn Phouybanhdyt ’17 and Joann Huynh ’17.

Chancellor's Scholars Cathryn Phouybanhdyt, left, and Joann Huynh show off their diploma covers during UW-Madison's winter commencement ceremony at the Kohl Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Dec. 17, 2017. The indoor graduation was attended by more than 1,100 bachelor's and master's degree candidates, plus their guests. (Photo by Jeff Miller / UW-Madison)
Chancellor's Scholars Cathryn Phouybanhdyt, left, and Joann Huynh show off their diploma covers during UW-Madison's winter commencement ceremony at the Kohl Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Dec. 17, 2017. The indoor graduation was attended by more than 1,100 bachelor's and master's degree candidates, plus their guests. (Photo by Jeff Miller / UW-Madison)

The campaign’s funds also support the work of pipeline programs such as PEOPLE, the Precollege Educational Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence. PEOPLE works with students from Milwaukee and Madison to help them get ready to be successful in college.

High school students Chane Skinner (center in green) and Micah Edwards-Sopha (far right) work with PEOPLE mentors Caitlin Iverson (left) and Shaya Glass (standing) to program video games during a Gaming for Girls  Pre-College Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE) workshop in Witte Residence Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2014. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)
High school students Chane Skinner (center in green) and Micah Edwards-Sopha (far right) work with PEOPLE mentors Caitlin Iverson (left) and Shaya Glass (standing) to program video games during a Gaming for Girls Pre-College Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE) workshop in Witte Residence Hall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2014. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

For out-of-state students, Raimey-Noland funds will help expand the Posse Program, which brings students to the UW in 10-person groups so they can support each other through their university years. Gabrielle Li entered under Posse in 2015 and graduated in 2019.

Student meets Stevenson Bryan

Programs

Schools, colleges, and campus units are using Raimey-Noland funds to help create or expand programs that support students from a wide variety of backgrounds. These include the André De Shields Fund, named for Broadway star André De Shields ’70, which supports diverse artistic projects and performances.

André De Shields ’70

Raimey-Noland gifts will also assist the UW’s Multicultural Student Center, which hosts the Black Cultural Center and events such as the Native November feast.

UW-Madison students sing a welcome song during a Native November feast event held in the at the Multicultural Student Center in the Red Gym at University of Wisconsin-Madison on Nov. 12, 2018. (Photo by Bryce Richter /UW-Madison)

Each school and college is taking part in the campaign. The College of Engineering, for instance, is enhancing its Leaders in Engineering Excellence and Diversity (LEED) program.

Places

One of the most visible outcomes of the Raimey-Noland Campaign is already under construction: the Divine Nine Plaza, a space that honors the contributions of historically Black fraternities and sororities. Construction began in April.

Attendees from Black Greek-letter fraternities and sororities are pictured taking a group photo during a dedication ceremony for the Divine Nine Garden Plaza project on East Campus Mall at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 24, 2021. The campus project will create a garden space and install historical markers recognizing the contributions of the National Pan-Hellinic Council (NPHC), the nine historically Black Greek-letter fraternities and sororities in the nation, also known as the Divine Nine. The site, currently a grassy area with park benches, is across East Campus Mall from the Walgreens on West Johnson Street.(Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

Featured News and Stories

<
>